PETER HAMMILL

PETER HAMMILL – “Enter K” (1982)

Any regular reader of ECR might be familiar with my jones for Van Der Graaf Generator and its leader, look Peter Hammill.

As part of my ongoing discography sweep project, I hit up the solo Peter Hammill about a year ago, and, like most long-spanning artists who start out in the ’70s, Hammill’s M.O. shifts considerably after the early ’80s. “Enter K” is the final album of his, I’ve found, to have any kind of sinister screwiness or true off-kilter bits. Wikipedia sez:

The album was Hammill’s first studio album to be recorded with the K Group, a band that he had formed in 1981 to tour material from his earlier albums A Black Box and Sitting Targets. Each member of the band adopted an alias: Hammill was K, John Ellis was Fury, Nic Potter was Mozart and Guy Evans was Brain.

Really, you should download this album for two tracks: “Paradox Drive” and “Accidents”. They might be two of the best songs of his entire humongous solo career. Really thunderous, adventurous, stirring stuff.

Peter Hammill – “Enter K” LP (ZIP file)
Peter Hammill on Amazon.com MP3 Store

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657 Responses to PETER HAMMILL

  1. Rich says:

    Thanks for that!
    Really digging PH’s post-VdGG career, especially that early 80′s era, when it seems lots of Prog-era artists were getting a creative second-wind (Gabriel, Fripp, to some extent).
    Much appreciated!

  2. RFW says:

    Dear ECR,

    Do you by any chance have The Anderson Council – The Fall Parade.

    I”ve been searching!

    Thanks,
    RFW

    PS – Loved the Hamill

  3. Mr X says:

    As a fan of Hammill since the early seventies I am at loss to see why this album should be singled out from his career. I say this because his albums prior to it are easily as good if not better. So I urge anyone who likes it and is not familiar with those albums to sought them out asap. Whats interesting though (for me if no one else) is that this is the last album of his that I loved and was disappointed in his subsequent work. A strange coincidence that.